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Online Courses Starting March 10th

1019-OL – The Anthropology of Pilgrimage

Credits – 3

This is an advanced level graduate course. It is designed to familiarize students online to contemporary anthropological theory with a specific focus upon the study of pilgrimage. In addition to researching Jewish, Christian, and Islamic pilgrimage in ancient, medieval, and contemporary historical contexts, students will be expected to become familiar with the work of contemporary scholars working on pilgrimage such as Victor and Edith Turner, Carol Delaney, John Eade, and Yoram Bilu. Students will examine various notions of sacred space and movement. Emphasis will be placed not only on the experience of pilgrims but on pilgrimage management and the contestation of sacred sites. While pilgrimage to Lourdes, Mecca, and other religious sites around the world will be discussed, prominence will be given to specific sites of pilgrimage in the Holy Land.

Instructor: C. Hutt, Ph.D.

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1028-OL – Religion and Public Life

Credits – 3

This is a graduate level survey course. It is designed to familiarize students online with recent developments in religion and political theory. Of particular interest will be the role played by religion in the public square, in Western secular societies as well as in the Near East. Attention will be given to two main forms of secular liberalism – namely, the natural human rights liberalism developed by David Little and the political liberalism of John Rawls. The work of Martha Nussbaum will also be addressed. Challenges to the secular liberal political traditions will be presented, such as is found in the work of Nicholas Wolterstorff and Jeffrey Stout. The class will end with an examination of Roxanne Euben’s recently published text on religion and comparative political theory, Enemy in the Mirror: Islamic Fundamentalism and the Limits of Modern Rationalism.

Instructor: C. Hutt, Ph.D.

(ON-LINE COURSE)

1056-OL – Topics in Comparative Ethics: Historians and Believers

Credits – 3

This is an advanced online graduate course on the ethics of historical belief. It focuses on the relationship between historians and believers, as well as that between the historians of competing religious traditions. Students will be encouraged to wrestle with the following questions: What does it mean to find or discover the past? To what extent is what counts as the past created or manufactured by narrativists in the present? What makes a belief about the past justified? Amongst the scholars we will turn to when answering these questions are Leopold von Ranke, Hayden White, R.G. Collingwood, Van Harvey, and John Dewey. Particular attention will be paid to problems generated the work of nineteenth century critical historians like David Strauss and Albert Schweitzer on early Christianity.

Instructor: C. Hutt, Ph.D.

(ON-LINE COURSE)

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(For more on our ONLINE and SUMMER COURSES)

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